October 27, 2005

Harriet Miers: My Two Cents

I've left this story alone, for a lot of reasons -- mainly because I don't like blogging politics, partially because I've not been impressed with the nominee. But now that the nomination is gone, I want to talk a little bit about why I'm glad.

I know nothing about Harriet Miers. She may be hugely qualified. SHe may have gone on to be the best justice we've had in a long time. But the only thing we really know about her is that she used to be Roman Catholic, and converted to evangelical, Protestant Christianity.

In the Roberts nomination, religion was off the table. Anyone who mentioned his faith was chastened, because it should only matter how good a justice he would be. And I agree with that -- there should be no litmus test of faith. We all wanted Roberts to be judged on his ability.

But not Miers. It's almost like Bush was saying to us, "Don't worry about what she thinks -- she's one of us! {wink, wink, nudge, nudge}" Christians were expected to support her because she's a Christian.

I don't like that attitude. I don't like being pandered to by the GOP, as if I'm some immature kid who has to have a candy bar thrown to him every so often so he doesn't act up. There are plenty of highly qualified, conservative judges out there who would be a slam-dunk nominee.

I almost thing that the President set Miers up for failure. It's as if he decided to give everyone the nominee that everyone feared the most, and then at the last minute pull her back and give us something else. And that's not fair to Harriet Miers, it's not fair to conservative Christians, and it's not fair to the counrty.

Posted by: Warren Kelly at 12:00 PM | Comments (1) | Add Comment
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1 I wondered if I was alone in feeling relief that Ms. Miers' nomination is withdrawn. Like you, I felt somewhat pandered to and more than a little insulted. I, for one, happen to believe that the US Supreme Court is no training ground. One must serve as a judge - and preferably a federal judge - to show what kind of judicial philosophy one would adopt as one's own. To simply say, "I might be inclined to ..." is just not good enough. Good riddance, I say.

Posted by: Michael at October 29, 2005 09:03 PM (eAYBB)

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